A fitting tribute to all the Men United

Nick Clegg with Men United stars David Kurke and Errol Mckellar

Nick Clegg with Men United stars Ray Clemence, David Kurke and Errol Mckellar

Last week Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Health Minister Norman Lamb celebrated the work of our supporters in an event at Admiralty House. Karen Stalbow, Head of Policy and Strategy was there and reflects on what occasions like these achieve.

Karen Stalbow, Head of Policy and Strategy

Karen Stalbow, Head of Policy and Strategy

Karen: “Having politicians celebrating our successes is a somewhat rare and glorious thing. That one of them was the Deputy Prime Minister (and our Patron) and the other the health minister, Norman Lamb gave the celebration a whole other level of gravitas. That we got to be in Admiralty House at their invitation was the icing on the cake.

“And they were right to celebrate. Not just because we’re an organisation that has lifted prostate cancer from obscurity and united hundreds of thousands of men to beat it. And not just because our research programmes drive progress, or because our campaigning delivers change for men and our services support them through difficult treatment choices and side-effects. They were right to celebrate because the audience these ministers addressed was made up of the people who have helped to drive our successes.

“And who are these people? Politicians? No. Celebrities? No, not them either. Magnates from the corporate world? Again, no. So who are these people? Who did Nick Clegg and Norman Lamb address?

Norman Lamb with William Kilgannon

Health Minister Norman Lamb with William Kilgannon

“They’re our supporters. They’re people like twelve-year-old William Kilgannon who collected 10,000 pennies for us. His father, Brian who did everything he could to support our award winning partnership with the team he’s supported all his life, Millwall Football Club. Or Nigel Lewis-Baker MBE, our captain of ‘raise awareness in drag’ events, which get men talking about the disease. ‘When men are in dresses,’ he told me, ‘they really open up and talk freely about prostate cancer.’ A lesson I think for us all. Or Errol McKellar, a car mechanic from Hackney who offers men discounts on an MOT at his garage if they will go and speak to their doctor about their prostate cancer risk.

“The list of unsung heroes goes on. There are the men with prostate cancer who regularly campaign with us and who, by doing so and lobbying their MPs in Parliament, ensured that prostate cancer was finally included within the Government’s ‘Be Clear on Cancer’ awareness programme. Then there are the individuals who have got the shadow Health Minister, Andy Burnham, active about prostate cancer. There are the awareness raisers, who give their time to speak to groups of men about the disease. These are the people we should be celebrating. And these are just a handful of the amazing dedicated individuals who have taken, and continue to take action to beat prostate cancer.

“We welcome their current unshaven appearance – often frowned upon in the presence of senior politicians – but crucial to Movember, generating millions of pounds for men with prostate cancer.

“But I want to end with a thought for the day – an insight that this event has given me. And this is it: It’s not often that our day-to-day activities allow us time to reflect. And why this thought? Because having the time to listen to the speeches given by Nick Clegg, Norman Lamb and our Chief Executive, Owen Sharp I was able to see just how far as an organisation we have come. By speaking to our supporters, I could recognise and appreciate how much they do. And so I think we should continue to use events like these to pause, reflect, value and celebrate everything which, as Men United against prostate cancer, we have achieved.

“And then we should quickly get back to the day-to-day because while we’ve achieved a lot, there’s no space for complacency. We all have much more to do.”

 

Royal Mail and Prostate Cancer UK: a partnership to be proud of

When you received a letter in the post in the last two years, chances are you’ll have seen a simple message in the postmark: Royal Mail is supporting Prostate Cancer UK. That statement of fact, franked onto millions of letters across the UK, still makes me smile two years later.

I remember distinctly the first time I had a letter land on my doormat at home that had this special postmark stamped on the top right corner. It wasn’t the first time I’d seen it of course, but these things always look better in the flesh, and it reinforced how lucky we were to have landed such a huge and influential partner in the Royal Mail.

Dr Fox models the Royal Mail poststamp

Neil Fox models the Royal Mail Prostate Cancer UK postmark

Royal Mail was our first major corporate partner as Prostate Cancer UK, and they helped us launch our new identity. For many people, seeing our logo on their post may have been the first time they had heard of us. Our identity as the largest men’s health charity in the UK has skyrocketed over the last few years (in this year’s Third Sector Charity Brand Index we’re 29 out of 150; in 2011 we weren’t even on the list) and it was Royal Mail who helped light the fuse. That’s some legacy.

Friday 29 August was the last day of this special partnership, and I would like to thank all 150,000 members of staff at Royal Mail for all they have done for us and for men over the past two years. Royal Mail have put everything into this partnership, and through their endeavours, have raised over £2.3 million with match-funding to fund 34 specialist prostate cancer nurses to provide men with support in communities across the UK. You read that correctly: £2.3 million.

Royal Mail staff take on the gruelling Lands End to John O'Groats for Prostate Cancer UK

Royal Mail staff take on the gruelling Lands End to John O’Groats for Prostate Cancer UK

How did they raise such a colossal amount of money? How didn’t they would be an easier question. I’ve rarely seen such levels of engagement with a workforce this big. From simple ideas like the Give a Quid days, which raised over £70,000, to full on challenges, like the Graduate Challenge programmes, which brought in almost £150,000, the staff of Royal Mail just kept on giving their time, money, and commitment to making a better future for men. The Royal Mail Choir, made famous through the BBC programme, even released a charity single.

Graduates

Royal Mail graduates arrive at the Prostate Cancer UK London office having cycled from Cardiff

It wasn’t just money that was raised through our partnership with Royal Mail, they helped us spread awareness of prostate cancer across the UK (including within their own workforce). Through taking part in our awareness campaigns such as the Sledgehammer Fund and Men United v prostate cancer, and distributing thousands of our Know your prostate guides, they’ve helped us increase the understanding and awareness of this horrible disease.

Royal Mail take a sledgehammer to prostate cancer

Royal Mail take a sledgehammer to prostate cancer

With partnerships as strong as these, now and in the future, I’m confident that we will crack prostate cancer. On behalf of Prostate Cancer UK, thank you to everyone at Royal Mail for all your hard work and support. You have made a real difference to the lives of men with prostate cancer, and there’s no better tribute than that.

Men United v Prostate Cancer

Bill Bailey and Men United

Bill Bailey is spearheading our Men United campaign

For many men in the UK, today is just another ordinary day. They’ll be getting up for work, slowly making their way to the office – it is a Friday after all – and getting on with working through just one more day before the weekend. But for around 100 men today, the next 24 hours will be indelibly scorched into their memories as the day they found out they had prostate cancer. It’s for these men – the 40,000 men diagnosed every year, the 10,000 who die, and the 250,000 men currently living with the disease – that we fight. Continue reading